But I’m Not a Housewife!

Domestic Bliss, Eventually

My Current Women’s Issues Reading Queue

It all started when Mad Men came out (which I immediately loved, loved, loved) and then I randomly found this book on the shelf at my local Library:

womensroompic

A reader review on Amazon.com says it more eloquently than I can at the moment:

5.0 out of 5 stars If you’re not a Feminist, read it anyway., July 25, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Women’s Room (Paperback)

French’s work is a maddening, beautiful, horrific, and eloquent work of artistry that truthfully tells of women’s lives. I recently read it at college (yes, I am Feminist, we’ll get that out of the way) and this novel allowed me to find the words to connect the thoughts that had been floating in my own head for years. The point of this novel is not even in its compelling, wonderful plot, it is in the ideas expressed and the intelligence of French’s work. I am certainly not a 1950’s suburban wife with two children, yet I found pieces of my life in every one of the characters of “The Women’s Room.” If you can get past the insipid idea that French is claiming all men are oppressive, all women meek or radical, and relationships between the genders are doomed, you’ll be a different person, emotionally and intellectually by the time you turn the final page. Read it slowly, savour the language, get angry, cry, laugh, become empowered, and find your own voice with the help of this remarkable novel.

I pretty much agree with everything said above by “A Customer.

I am also reading For Her Own Good, by Barbara Ehrenreich (who wrote Nickel and Dimed) and Deirdre English.

forherowngood

It is an excellent book about the history of women and the rise of the psychological and medical professions along with their “expert” advice to women in the past two centuries. I found out about it because my mom is currently reading it – thanks, mom!

I’ve also just finished Happy Housewives, by Darla Shine, of the Happy Housewives Club

This book apparently comes in three colors.

I’m dying to post a proper review of this book, because although I mostly enjoyed it and devoured it in one weekend, I had mixed feeling about it. The reviews by readers have been mixed and cite two things of which I was also acutely aware when I read it:

  • It is, unfortunately written with the assumption that the reader is an Upper Class American.
  • Her holier-than-thou, “judgy, snotty way of referring to those different from herself” writing style was terribly offputting.

More to come on that book.

Finally, these are next books in my reading queue, which I have on order at the public library:

womdtu2

 

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2 Comments»

  Untypically Jia wrote @

You should check out happyhousewivesclub.com
It’s a website that Darla Shine runs based on the book. It has forums, and daily contributors that offer there expertise in a lot of areas.

Darla can be intense sometimes, but she’s so unbelievably wonderful and generous. Some may take the book as though it were written specifically for the upper class American, but check out her website, because it’s for all classes (and most of the readers there are lower to middle class.)

  Jessielme wrote @

Thanks for the comment, Jia!

I know, I feel bad that I only tossed in my more critical comments in this post, because there were things I loved about the book. I’ll make sure I do the full review sometime this week. And it is a good point that her website is more inclusive – including even working moms. I might have forgotten to include that in my review if you hadn’t reminded me.


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